Job Seeker

Telework as a Recruitment Tool

Employers in the US, Europe, Japan and numerous other countries are finding that one of most valuable tools for recruitment and retention is offering work options – compressed workweeks, flextime and telecommuting. More and more employees are working 9 day 80 hour 2 week schedules, changing their start or finish times from the usual rush-hour 7-9 am and 4-6 pm commute times, and working from home or satellite office locations.

Telecommuting is increasing exponentially, with an estimated 32 million US employees now teleworking, at least on a part time basis.
Why the popularity of telework? Employers consistently list retention as their number one reason, with recruitment a close second. There are a number of reasons why telework is a benefit for employer, employee and society as a whole. Let’s take a look at some of them:

  • Ecological advantages such as reduction of air pollution and gas consumption
  • Reduction in governmental expenses for infrastructure and road maintenance
  • Competitive advantage in attraction of employees, especially high-tech
  • Increases in employee satisfaction, resulting in increased employee retention
  • Reduction in facility costs for expansion and new real estate
  • Reduced parking requirements
  • Expansion of the labor pool
  • Reduction of non-productive (water cooler) office time
  • Expansion of service hours
  • Improved productivity
  • Improved work quality through faster processing, fewer errors, and shorter response time for communications
  • Reduction of absenteeism and tardiness
  • Enhanced peak performance due to telecommuters working during their most productive hours
  • Maximizing potential by broadening responsibilities
  • Work accomplished with fewer interruptions
  • Assistance in compliance with clean air, ADA and other statutes
  • Reduction in traffic congestion
  • Increased electronic communication with decrease of paper consumption
  • Reduced business disruptions due to natural disaster, bad weather, power outages, transit strikes and other unforeseen events
  • Reduction in traffic accidents
  • Reduction in health insurance costs due to reduction in traffic and stress
  • Safer communities due to more people at home during the day
  • Enhanced rural development
  • Better balance of economic activity between rural and urban areas, bringing economic revival, employment and population stability to remote and rural communities, including to tribal areas
  • Economically struggling former manufacturing areas such as the Mid-Atlantic United States or seasonal/resort areas might be able to retain or attract numerous year round residents and some of their tax base formerly lost to high-tech or service industry areas
  • Reduction of juvenile crime


While telework is not for everyone – many employers affirming that those who are continually tardy, not sufficiently self-motivated, or needing the constant interaction of their peers are not well suited for this option – job seekers and employees continually mention that a firm offering this and other work/family options goes to the ‘head of the line’ when they are job searching. Telework can also be a great tool for widening your pool of candidates, not only geographically, but also by being able to include the homebound disabled.

As one employer put it, “This is the way the world is going. If you’re not offering telework, you are losing candidates to me.”

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Major Disadvantages of Using Popular Job Boards for Your Professional Search

The digital media has provided a wide range of opportunities to streamline and boost communications particularly in the job search sector. Professional job search is a major project to undertake specifically if you are not clear about the distinction between established job sites with real opportunities and the ones that are just fronts for unqualified or unacceptable offers.

What attracts visitors to Job sites

Major Job boards today have brought forth the modern concept of connecting potential employees with a variety of job opportunities. One of the key issues with this situation is that many job boards are designed to attract both job seekers and potential employers without truly understanding “The Connection” needed between the two.  Most hopeful job seekers fall prey to the elaborate marketing and appeal of the job boards mentioned below:

  • Job boards claiming to use modern predictive algorithms to match you to your perfect professional opportunity match.
  • The ease of seeking a new job from directly an interface that reduces having to make direct calls and applying resumes to different professional offices, the job sites promise to lower the usual stress of handling multiple professional discussions and applications right from a single platform.
  • The overwhelming competition in almost every professional sector makes it hard for potential job seekers to rely on simply their own struggles to get them through to major professional opportunities.


Potential pitfalls of using Job boards for your professional search

Lack of personal impressions

Professional networking is hugely co-dependent on personal impressions that you make on the job front. In absence of face-to-face networking, job sites often fail to display your true potential or persona to potential employers and often you lose out on great opportunities due to minor technicalities which would not have been a problem in conventional job interviews.

High level of competition

Job sites do not screen candidates applying for various professional positions. This results in every job offer on the site being inundated with high level of completion. While many of these competitors are not even from your field but employers find it tedious to screen through thousands of applicants and often end up choosing from the first few application in the pile. This reduces your chances of getting a truly deserving position because your applications get lost in the crowd of undeserving noise.

Absence of direct connections

Often Job boards pose a complete project in itself with the posting of regular job descriptions, screening candidates and conducting initial interviews. Therefore, many big firms outsource the project to recruiters and professional headhunters. This reduces your chances of building direct connections within a company and brings down your potential success rates for getting through to an actual experienced people in the field to impress for the position.

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